Eunice de Souza talks about Bloodline Bandra in Mumbai Mirror

Pali Hill, New York, Pali Hill Godfrey Joseph Pereira’s book mirrors the romance of his vibrant roots. His language is a delicious marinade of the Indianness and the Catholicism that gives Bandra its...
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Rotary Club and Bloodline Bandra

Was invited by the Rotary Club of Bombay, Bandra last night, 9th December, 2014 to talk about Bloodline Bandra. Thank You, Sudhir Widge and Monica Grover for organizing the event. We had a great conversation about what constitutes “Legal Slavery.” A fantastic back and forth. About India, about America, about Legal Slavery in these modern times of ours. I hope this conversation continues. I also got a chance to listen to the tireless social work that The Rotary organization does and their plans for the near future. The personal time its members give up to work for the poor and needy and sick is truly commendable. It is all so good....
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Big News Live Covers Bloodline Bandra

The book of Godfrey Joseph Pereira, Bloodline Bandra, tells the story of how a boy from Bandra, Bombay is trapped in Legal Slavery by his own people, the Indians, in New York City and this brutality of the story will shock the readers. The book is an engrossing tale of love and loss, of home and homelessness. The protagonist, David Cabral, a journalist and also one of the originals, an East Indian from Pali, manages to move from his village and head to New York to chase the big American dream. But after reaching there, his dream crashes as he isn’t able to make both ends meet. This is his story narrated by the soul of David Cabral. Bloodline Bandra Part I describe and interpret the complex rustic life style of the East Indians in Pali Village where its inhabitants speak a vibrant, funny and thoroughly entertaining form of English. What is more difficult was that he couldn’t collect enough money to head back to India. In between, he finds solace in a Japanese cello student, with whom he falls in love. But that too isn’t promising because of their cultural differences. This book captures with flair and humours favourable language of the East Indians, life in the tight-knit community of Pali village and a way of life that is dying. This is the truth of what many Indians do to their fellow Indians abroad.   Read the...
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Times of India reviews Bloodline Bandra

Painting a vivid portrait of life in the Pali village, the book is an engrossing tale of love and loss, of home and homelessness. The protagonist, David Cabral, a journalist and also one of the originals – an East Indian from Pali – manages to move from his village and head to New York to chase the big American dream. But after reaching there, his dream crashes as he isn’t able to make both ends meet. What is more difficult was that he couldn’t collect enough money to head back to India. In between, he finds solace in a Japanese cello student, with whom he falls in love. But that too isn’t promising because of their cultural differences. This book captures with flair and wit the flavourable language of the East Indians, life in the tight-knit community of Pali village and a way of life that is dying. Read the review here....
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